Here’s why marketing and project management aren’t two mutually exclusive disciplines, and how they’re more like a Venn diagram with lots of common ground in the middle.

  1. Results mean everything. Our results will almost always have a huge impact on what our marketing efforts look like in the future. Past results will often determine how big or small our budget is for the next year, what kinds of marketing we can justify investing more in, what kinds of efforts we can rein in, and what kinds of campaigns our target markets respond best to. Even the headcount will be affected b results.

A good project management tool will make it easy for you to set up standard procedure for tracking and storing results and analytics. A great project management tool lets you upload documents and spreadsheets, edit and add notes to them, and make it clear who is responsible for what initiative and that initiative’s results.

  1. A campaign has lots of roles and moving parts. The importance of staying on the same page is multiplied when you have a big team in lots of different kinds of roles—ranging from artistic roles like illustrators and copywriters, to technical roles like coders and data analysts.

5a1c1f9ca87cf.png

A great PM tool can help you get organized during the moment of truth, the most crucial test of whether or not your moving parts have come together in perfect harmony: product and campaign launches.

In Workzone, you can create individual project spaces for your biggest campaigns, events, product launches or even customers with individual project workspaces. You can set up smaller projects within these larger workspaces, stop your files from getting mixed up and know where each project stands before launch day. Everything remains organized and on track with workspaces.

  1. A campaign IS a project. And just like any other kind of project, a campaign has a budget, a set of team members and roles, a timeline, data and target markets, and a goal. And keeping all this important campaign info in separate places (spreadsheets, Google Calendar, a few word docs) sounds super cumbersome and will never give your team the full birds-eye view of the campaign.
Here’s why marketing and project management aren’t two mutually exclusive disciplines, and how they’re more like a Venn diagram with lots of common ground in the middle. 1. Results mean everything. Our results will almost always have a huge impact on what our marketing efforts look like in the future. Past results will often determine how big or small our budget is for the next year, what kinds of marketing we can justify investing more in, what kinds of efforts we can rein in, and what kinds of campaigns our target markets respond best to. Even the headcount will be affected b results. A good project management tool will make it easy for you to set up standard procedure for tracking and storing results and analytics. A great project management tool lets you upload documents and spreadsheets, edit and add notes to them, and make it clear who is responsible for what initiative and that initiative’s results. 2. A campaign has lots of roles and moving parts. The importance of staying on the same page is multiplied when you have a big team in lots of different kinds of roles—ranging from artistic roles like illustrators and copywriters, to technical roles like coders and data analysts. ![5a1c1f9ca87cf.png](serve/attachment&path=5a1c1f9ca87cf.png) A great PM tool can help you get organized during the moment of truth, the most crucial test of whether or not your moving parts have come together in perfect harmony: product and campaign launches. In Workzone, you can create individual project spaces for your biggest campaigns, events, product launches or even customers with individual project workspaces. You can set up smaller projects within these larger workspaces, stop your files from getting mixed up and know where each project stands before launch day. Everything remains organized and on track with workspaces. 3. A campaign IS a project. And just like any other kind of project, a campaign has a budget, a set of team members and roles, a timeline, data and target markets, and a goal. And keeping all this important campaign info in separate places (spreadsheets, Google Calendar, a few word docs) sounds super cumbersome and will never give your team the full birds-eye view of the campaign.
edited Nov 27 '17 at 7:53 pm
 
0
reply
48
views
0
replies
1
followers
live preview
enter atleast 10 characters
WARNING: You mentioned %MENTIONS%, but they cannot see this message and will not be notified
Saving...
Saved
With selected deselect posts show selected posts
All posts under this topic will be deleted ?
Pending draft ... Click to resume editing
Discard draft