TIP #1: write tests
The first step to API testing is to actually do it. Without good tests, it’s impossible to have full confidence in your API’s behavior, consistency, or backward compatibility. As your codebase grows and changes over time, tests will save you time and frustration by spotting breaking changes.

TIP #2: don't mix tests and documentation
Many people use Postman Collections to document their APIs, either as a collection of example requests that can be easily shared among team members, or as public API documentation for customers.

TIP #3: organize tests into folders
As your API grows in complexity, it will become important to organize your tests so they make sense and can be found easily. I suggest that you use folders to group requests by resource, test suite, and workflows.

TIP #4: JSON Schema validation
Many modern APIs use some form of JSON Schema to define the structure of their requests and responses. Postman includes the tv4 library, which makes it easy to write tests to verify that your API responses comply with your JSON Schema definitions.

TIP #5: reuse code
In the previous tip, I showed you how to easily reuse the same JSON Schema for multiple requests in your collection by storing it in an environment variable. You can also reuse JavaScript code the same way by leveraging the eval() function.

TIP #7: automate your tests with Postman's collection runner
Up to now, we've focused on running a single request and testing the response. That approach works great while you're writing your tests, but once they're all written, you'll want an easy way to run all of your requests quickly and see the results in a single view.

TIP #8: automate your tests with Newman
The Postman collection runner is a great way to run all of your tests and see the results, but it still requires you to manually initiate the run. If you want to run your Postman tests as part of your Continuous Integration or Continuous Delivery pipeline, then you'll need to use the Newman CLI.

TIP #9: automate your tests with Postman Monitors
You can use Postman Monitors to automatically run your Postman tests at regular intervals, such as every night, or every 5 minutes. You'll automatically be notified if any of your tests ever fail, and you can even integrate with a variety of third-party services, such as PagerDuty, Slack, Datadog, and more.

TIP #10: dynamically control test workflows
By default, the Postman collection runner, Newman, and Postman Monitors will run each request in your collection in order. But you can use the postman.setNextRequest() function to change the order. This allows you to conditionally skip certain requests, repeat requests, terminate the collection early, etc.

TIP #1: write tests The first step to API testing is to actually do it. Without good tests, it’s impossible to have full confidence in your API’s behavior, consistency, or backward compatibility. As your codebase grows and changes over time, tests will save you time and frustration by spotting breaking changes. TIP #2: don't mix tests and documentation Many people use Postman Collections to document their APIs, either as a collection of example requests that can be easily shared among team members, or as public API documentation for customers. TIP #3: organize tests into folders As your API grows in complexity, it will become important to organize your tests so they make sense and can be found easily. I suggest that you use folders to group requests by resource, test suite, and workflows. TIP #4: JSON Schema validation Many modern APIs use some form of JSON Schema to define the structure of their requests and responses. Postman includes the tv4 library, which makes it easy to write tests to verify that your API responses comply with your JSON Schema definitions. TIP #5: reuse code In the previous tip, I showed you how to easily reuse the same JSON Schema for multiple requests in your collection by storing it in an environment variable. You can also reuse JavaScript code the same way by leveraging the eval() function. TIP #7: automate your tests with Postman's collection runner Up to now, we've focused on running a single request and testing the response. That approach works great while you're writing your tests, but once they're all written, you'll want an easy way to run all of your requests quickly and see the results in a single view. TIP #8: automate your tests with Newman The Postman collection runner is a great way to run all of your tests and see the results, but it still requires you to manually initiate the run. If you want to run your Postman tests as part of your Continuous Integration or Continuous Delivery pipeline, then you'll need to use the Newman CLI. TIP #9: automate your tests with Postman Monitors You can use Postman Monitors to automatically run your Postman tests at regular intervals, such as every night, or every 5 minutes. You'll automatically be notified if any of your tests ever fail, and you can even integrate with a variety of third-party services, such as PagerDuty, Slack, Datadog, and more. TIP #10: dynamically control test workflows By default, the Postman collection runner, Newman, and Postman Monitors will run each request in your collection in order. But you can use the postman.setNextRequest() function to change the order. This allows you to conditionally skip certain requests, repeat requests, terminate the collection early, etc.
edited Nov 28 '17 at 6:33 pm
 
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