Automation Team Rolling Out Test Automation Project by Project

5ae0521abcbf0.png

The best piece of advice I can give is to start with the small things, then go big. The proven first practice is to start by creating an automation team.

I recommend starting with the most impactful test cases: the ones that cover your top business risks. This creates the foundation for a powerful regression portfolio that can provide fast feedback on whether application changes broke previously working functionality.

The automation team should include at least one test design specialist, who starts by reviewing the requirements and using test case design approaches to map out the test cases that should be automated. Then, the test design specialist or one of the two or three automation specialists can evaluate if test data management (TDM) is needed, and they can collaborate on defining the test cases. Meanwhile, the test design specialist will take care of the next project.

Depending on the software you want to test and how much you have customized it, an automation engineer could be required. They will ensure that custom controls are created and later maintained.

The size of the team will increase over time, depending on the number of test cases and projects the team has to handle. These suggestions are only for the initial rollout. As soon as the rollout starts progressing, you’ll want to start recruiting more people as soon as possible.

Once the test cases are automated, they can run on test virtual machines overnight, then report execution results on a daily basis. The most important thing for getting test automation up and running is to actually run test cases! If you’re not running your tests, you’re not receiving any value from them, no matter how well-designed your test suite is and how well it covers your top business risks.

Depending on your company structure (agile or not, testing teams or independent testers), the automation team may take the lead on educating everyone about the overall automation best practices to apply and the project variations they should consider as they start their own test automation.

Before testers start applying test automation, a decision must be made: Who is responsible for the test cases? This is critical. If the automation team (or maybe later the regression team) is responsible, then they have to communicate much more with the testers and the business side. If it’s the testers’ responsibility, they need enough time to ensure all test cases are running and meet business expectations. Each organization needs to decide what’s best for them, depending on their structure and working style.

**Automation Team Rolling Out Test Automation Project by Project** ![5ae0521abcbf0.png](serve/attachment&path=5ae0521abcbf0.png) The best piece of advice I can give is to start with the small things, then go big. The proven first practice is to start by creating an automation team. I recommend starting with the most impactful test cases: the ones that cover your top business risks. This creates the foundation for a powerful regression portfolio that can provide fast feedback on whether application changes broke previously working functionality. The automation team should include at least one test design specialist, who starts by reviewing the requirements and using test case design approaches to map out the test cases that should be automated. Then, the test design specialist or one of the two or three automation specialists can evaluate if test data management (TDM) is needed, and they can collaborate on defining the test cases. Meanwhile, the test design specialist will take care of the next project. Depending on the software you want to test and how much you have customized it, an automation engineer could be required. They will ensure that custom controls are created and later maintained. The size of the team will increase over time, depending on the number of test cases and projects the team has to handle. These suggestions are only for the initial rollout. As soon as the rollout starts progressing, you’ll want to start recruiting more people as soon as possible. Once the test cases are automated, they can run on test virtual machines overnight, then report execution results on a daily basis. The most important thing for getting test automation up and running is to actually run test cases! If you’re not running your tests, you’re not receiving any value from them, no matter how well-designed your test suite is and how well it covers your top business risks. Depending on your company structure (agile or not, testing teams or independent testers), the automation team may take the lead on educating everyone about the overall automation best practices to apply and the project variations they should consider as they start their own test automation. Before testers start applying test automation, a decision must be made: Who is responsible for the test cases? This is critical. If the automation team (or maybe later the regression team) is responsible, then they have to communicate much more with the testers and the business side. If it’s the testers’ responsibility, they need enough time to ensure all test cases are running and meet business expectations. Each organization needs to decide what’s best for them, depending on their structure and working style.
edited Apr 25 at 3:34 pm
 
0
reply
44
views
0
replies
1
followers
live preview
enter atleast 10 characters
WARNING: You mentioned %MENTIONS%, but they cannot see this message and will not be notified
Saving...
Saved
With selected deselect posts show selected posts
All posts under this topic will be deleted ?
Pending draft ... Click to resume editing
Discard draft