5ae0638086327.png

Today, I want to focus on the electronic type of survey. Not because the other types – written and in-person – are inferior; but because there’s a real opportunity with electronic pulses to automate some tasks that, with the others, you would have to do manually. Confused? Don’t be. Keep reading and I promise I’ll get to it. An electronic survey can be distributed several ways:

· A short 5-10 question survey at predesignated intervals like 60 days or six months.

· A one-question survey distributed at random times or automatically after one week or 30 days.

· OR a combination of both.

“The number of questions should be kept to a minimum, no more than 10 if you want to get maximum participation. Of course, this means it’s crucial to get those questions just right, so there needs to be some thinking about what is truly important to explore. In our Onboarding Check Survey Platform, we only ask five, which we feel is enough to identify how the process is going along, if there are any issues impeding progress or the relationship is at risk. In terms of how often, that really depends on how long a company feels their onboarding process takes. If it’s just a couple of months, once is probably enough. If it’s longer, maybe two or three times.”

Good Questions Lead to Valuable Feedback
Here I have mentioned the importance of good question design. That can’t be emphasized enough. Once the survey methodology has been defined, it’s important to design and implement it well. Pulses must have a purpose.Here are a couple of examples:

  1. Please rate your experience at our company so far:

    A. I ‘ve had an easy time meeting my coworkers.

    B. The job is what was explained to me during the interview.

    C. Communication from my supervisor is clear

    D. The employee handbook has provided me with helpful information.

  2. If a friend or acquaintance were looking for a job, how likely would you be to recommend that they apply here?

    Keep in mind, you’ve heard me say before, “The worst thing organizations can do is ask employees for feedback and do nothing with the information.” Pulse surveys should be actionable. And, this is the piece that I believe can separate electronic check-ins from written or in-person ones.

However, if HR is using the electronic pulse results to notice a trend around the organization, they are in a position to address it. Conversely, if the company makes a change based on employee pulse results, they have the ability to potentially send prior survey participants a quick one question check-in to see if the issue was addressed. This allows employees to see that the company is paying attention, which increases employee loyalty and engagement. Thus, improving retention.

![5ae0638086327.png](serve/attachment&path=5ae0638086327.png) Today, I want to focus on the electronic type of survey. Not because the other types – written and in-person – are inferior; but because there’s a real opportunity with electronic pulses to automate some tasks that, with the others, you would have to do manually. Confused? Don’t be. Keep reading and I promise I’ll get to it. An electronic survey can be distributed several ways: · A short 5-10 question survey at predesignated intervals like 60 days or six months. · A one-question survey distributed at random times or automatically after one week or 30 days. · OR a combination of both. “The number of questions should be kept to a minimum, no more than 10 if you want to get maximum participation. Of course, this means it’s crucial to get those questions just right, so there needs to be some thinking about what is truly important to explore. In our Onboarding Check Survey Platform, we only ask five, which we feel is enough to identify how the process is going along, if there are any issues impeding progress or the relationship is at risk. In terms of how often, that really depends on how long a company feels their onboarding process takes. If it’s just a couple of months, once is probably enough. If it’s longer, maybe two or three times.” **Good Questions Lead to Valuable Feedback** Here I have mentioned the importance of good question design. That can’t be emphasized enough. Once the survey methodology has been defined, it’s important to design and implement it well. Pulses must have a purpose.Here are a couple of examples: 1. Please rate your experience at our company so far: A. I ‘ve had an easy time meeting my coworkers. B. The job is what was explained to me during the interview. C. Communication from my supervisor is clear D. The employee handbook has provided me with helpful information. 2. If a friend or acquaintance were looking for a job, how likely would you be to recommend that they apply here? Keep in mind, you’ve heard me say before, “The worst thing organizations can do is ask employees for feedback and do nothing with the information.” Pulse surveys should be actionable. And, this is the piece that I believe can separate electronic check-ins from written or in-person ones. However, if HR is using the electronic pulse results to notice a trend around the organization, they are in a position to address it. Conversely, if the company makes a change based on employee pulse results, they have the ability to potentially send prior survey participants a quick one question check-in to see if the issue was addressed. This allows employees to see that the company is paying attention, which increases employee loyalty and engagement. Thus, improving retention.
edited Apr 25 at 4:58 pm
 
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