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You’ve heard me say before that one of the worst things organizations can do is ask employees for feedback and then not do anything with it. This HR Bartender reader knows it’s true and is wondering what to do about it.

"About four months ago, I incorporated ‘Feedback Friday’ at my organization, and have received very positive comments. However, I still struggle on what to do with the results, besides just sharing them.

Individuals within an organization want to feel that they contribute in more than just one way, more than just doing work. Another means to do this is sharing ideas and feedback. So, listening to what employees have to say gives them another path to contribute to the organization. Of course, it makes good business sense to listen anyway. Management doesn’t have all the good ideas.
When employees take the time, make the efforts, and in some cases muster up the courage, to offer feedback, they do so with hopes something will happen. This isn’t to say something will always happen after offering feedback, but they hope to make a difference in some way. This said, organizations need to close the loop. They need to share results to let employees know they have been heard.

I’ll give you three things to consider:

  1. Keep the feedback general in nature to protect confidentiality. This means ‘aggregating’ what has been heard.
  2. If you have numbers (like percentages), use charts, pictures and graphs to tell your story. Good visuals help communicate quickly. Assuming the information will be broadly shared or disseminated, using visuals can help tell the story without you being there.
  3. If you have a lot of feedback in the form of comments, spend time going through a coding process to turn those comments into numbers.

For example, let’s say you receive the following comment: ‘I really like my manager and she does a great job, but management really hasn’t given me a clear picture on where we are going.’ This comment can be ‘coded’ into two themes: Manager does a good job, management needs to share the vision. By coding comments, you can more easily share with others and track numerically the key ideas that are being brought forward.

If a company receives feedback that they just can’t implement – maybe it’s too expensive or just doesn’t make sense for the business – how can they tell employees that they’re listened but they’re not going to do it?

Well, preparing for this possibility starts at the start. Before implementing a feedback/listening process, tell employees that:

1) The organization does care and does want to listen but,

2) May not be able to act on everything.

There really are ideas and suggestions that come through via feedback that don’t make business sense for many reasons. You can also set a rule, the rule being that employees that make suggestions or offer feedback can follow-up. If someone has offered an idea and nothing has happened, let employees know they can ask their manager or other designated person why nothing has happened and get an explanation. This takes us back to honesty and transparency.

![5ae06dd91360e.png](serve/attachment&path=5ae06dd91360e.png) You’ve heard me say before that one of the worst things organizations can do is ask employees for feedback and then not do anything with it. This HR Bartender reader knows it’s true and is wondering what to do about it. "About four months ago, I incorporated ‘Feedback Friday’ at my organization, and have received very positive comments. However, I still struggle on what to do with the results, besides just sharing them. Individuals within an organization want to feel that they contribute in more than just one way, more than just doing work. Another means to do this is sharing ideas and feedback. So, listening to what employees have to say gives them another path to contribute to the organization. Of course, it makes good business sense to listen anyway. Management doesn’t have all the good ideas. When employees take the time, make the efforts, and in some cases muster up the courage, to offer feedback, they do so with hopes something will happen. This isn’t to say something will always happen after offering feedback, but they hope to make a difference in some way. This said, organizations need to close the loop. They need to share results to let employees know they have been heard. I’ll give you three things to consider: 1. Keep the feedback general in nature to protect confidentiality. This means ‘aggregating’ what has been heard. 2. If you have numbers (like percentages), use charts, pictures and graphs to tell your story. Good visuals help communicate quickly. Assuming the information will be broadly shared or disseminated, using visuals can help tell the story without you being there. 3. If you have a lot of feedback in the form of comments, spend time going through a coding process to turn those comments into numbers. For example, let’s say you receive the following comment: ‘I really like my manager and she does a great job, but management really hasn’t given me a clear picture on where we are going.’ This comment can be ‘coded’ into two themes: Manager does a good job, management needs to share the vision. By coding comments, you can more easily share with others and track numerically the key ideas that are being brought forward. If a company receives feedback that they just can’t implement – maybe it’s too expensive or just doesn’t make sense for the business – how can they tell employees that they’re listened but they’re not going to do it? Well, preparing for this possibility starts at the start. Before implementing a feedback/listening process, tell employees that: 1) The organization does care and does want to listen but, 2) May not be able to act on everything. There really are ideas and suggestions that come through via feedback that don’t make business sense for many reasons. You can also set a rule, the rule being that employees that make suggestions or offer feedback can follow-up. If someone has offered an idea and nothing has happened, let employees know they can ask their manager or other designated person why nothing has happened and get an explanation. This takes us back to honesty and transparency.
edited Apr 25 at 5:35 pm
 
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