5ae1968301aa8.png

We believe that the most valuable resources an organization has are its human resources. And we believe in showing employees how valuable they are to the organization. That’s why we encourage offering valuable benefits and perks to employees and why we have created a culture of appreciation within our own company.

It’s a philosophy that’s not necessarily new—the idea that employees who are treated better perform better—but it’s starting to gain momentum in the professional world. Around the world, companies are beginning to realize that offering major benefits like flexible work schedules, unlimited PTO, and unique perks like a vacation reimbursement program can do wonders for morale and productivity.

Unfortunately, despite the growing body of evidence in favor of this philosophy, many employers are still skeptical and reluctant to offer much beyond a steady paycheck. To help convince naysayers that pampering employees promotes productivity, we asked industry professionals about their experiences with offering benefits and perks. The response was overwhelming, and each CEO, COO, and HR professional that responded was in favor of them.

Here, we share with you their insights, experiences, and advice. We hope it will inspire you to go and do likewise. It’s our firm belief that as you use benefits and perks to show your workforce that their contributions are appreciated and that they are valued as individuals, you will see engagement levels increase, retention rates improve, and your organization will become more attractive to prospective employees.

The Impact of Benefits and Perks on Employee Engagement and Retention

“Due to the improved economic and job market conditions, the advantage has shifted from the employer to the job seeker, and organizations need to recognize the correlation between benefits and employee retention. In today’s hiring market, a generous benefits package is essential for engaging and retaining your talent.”

It’s becoming harder and harder for employers to ignore: the healthier the job market, the easier it is for employees to jump ship when they find something better. Attracting and keeping employees takes offering them a position at a company where their work is seen as a valuable contribution.

“Benefits and perks are a huge part of employee engagement and retention,” says Mary Pharris of Fairygodboss. “For companies to attract top talent and retain them, competitive benefit packages are essential. Employees rely on a variety of benefits from employers, so making sure you’re offering competitive and desired benefits will help you in attracting talent.”

While not everyone agrees that attracting talent is the goal of perks and benefits, the belief in its power to boost engagement and retention is both ubiquitous and unanimous. “While benefits are not a large driver of talent acquisition,” says Jody Ordioni, Founder of Brandemix, “they have a tremendous positive impact on engagement and retention, especially now that millennials represent 30+ percent of today’s workforce.”

Most importantly, offering a generous benefits package has a non-trivial impact, observable by many businesses. According to Lee Fisher, HR manager at Blinds Direct, “For us, these perks are tremendously important, from the moment an applicant sees a job ad and applies for a job here. Five or six years down the line, employee benefits continue to play a major role in keeping our valuable team members happy.”

It seems every company that’s putting this philosophy into practice is noticing a difference. “Company benefits play a huge role in employee retention,” says Steve Pritchard, founder of Cuuver. “It’s a two-way street; if an employer is flexible and offers great benefits, staff are generally more likely to want to stay working for them and appreciate the perks they are being offered that they may not get at another company.”

Is There a Downside to Benefits and Perks?


Finding Balance

Despite the growing evidence, some businesses are still skeptical. The high price of some benefits may intimidate a cost-conscious professional. Some even believe their workforce can’t be trusted with the freedom and responsibility of benefits like flexible work schedules. Some don’t think they need or deserve such luxuries.

It may even be a simple lack of thinking outside the box on the part of the employer. Whatever the reason, each employer may be overlooking an important fact—that without their team, they don’t have a business. Benefits and perks are investments in your workforce, and they pay dividends in the form of loyalty and dedication to the company. Lisa Oyler, HR director at Access Perks, agrees:

We always say that no company has ever suffered from trying to be more empathetic to their customers and employees. The cost and effort are worth it when you consider the huge advantages of employee engagement and retention and the costs of turnover and disengagement.

5ae1991705663.jpg

In my experience, employees are very appreciative of the perks they are given and do not abuse them. I can’t say this will be the same in every business, but because these benefits are there to make them happier, employees generally make the most of them and perform better. Some companies believe that having strict rules and no extra benefits is the way to go – which is why they don’t hold on to their best staff members for very long.

Obstacles on the Path

Even if you decide that your employees are worth the investment, there are hurdles to clear on the road to successfully implementing your benefits and perks.
The one negative I’ve become aware of is when managers aren’t on board with the benefits culture; i.e. if an organization encourages remote work but one’s manager requires all employees to be on-site, it creates a culture of resentment which could have an opposite effect from the desired results.

The Most Effective Benefits and Perks

So what benefits and perks you should be offering? Which ones give you the highest return on investment? We think Patrick Colvin’s take sums it up best:

The fact of the matter is, after health insurance, the most desirable perks and benefits are those that offer flexibility while improving work-life balance.

Flexible Work Schedule/Telecommuting

By far the most ubiquitous, popular, and highly recommended benefit among business owners and management teams was a flexible work schedule (usually including telecommuting & work-from-home options). This is largely due to the much-discussed “work-life balance.” Michelle Hayward, CEO, and Founder of Bluedog Design thinks that flexible work schedules should see even more use:

“The most under-appreciated and under-utilized perk in a modern workplace is flexibility. With accountability to the team in mind, employees are empowered to make decisions to attend a child’s school performance or to work from home when life happens or plan flex hours to make a commute less stressful.”

Robin Schwartz agrees:

“Flexible work schedules! Being able to occasionally work remotely as well as being able to shift hours that best fit an employee’s life and job goes a really long way in keeping employees happy and [maintaining] engagement. Knowing they are encouraged to balance their work and life is a great perk.”

5ae19b2435a96.jpg

“From our research, we know that women’s job satisfaction is directly related to job flexibility. More and more employees are wanting flexible work environments. In large part, I think this is because life isn’t confined to the hours before or after work. Employees want the option to take care both of personal and professional responsibilities on their own terms, and with so much technology to make working remotely easy, it’s increasingly easier for employees to satisfy this.”

Far from stifling or inhibiting productivity, this benefit seems to enhance it, according to our responders. Lee Fisher puts it this way:

“We’ve come to realize that flexible-working is one of the biggest benefits for our staff. When we give our team the option to adapt their hours and work locations, they appreciate our flexibility and in turn produce even better results. It’s a simple perk, but a seriously important one.”

Generous/Unlimited Vacation

5ae19b649bc43.jpg

A generous amount of time off. Giving employees plenty of opportunities to pursue their personal passions and unwind from work can go a long way towards improving their performance when they are at work. This ensures they don’t become frustrated with the lack of ability to take more than one vacation a year or take a few long weekends.”

Unlimited Vacation – to give the team the flexibility and reassurance that they can feel comfortable taking time off without penalty goes a long way. They don’t have to stress over a random Friday or afternoon where they need to be somewhere else (for themselves or family) and how it will overall effect their time off at the end of the year. One of our core values is to be empowered to be awesome in work and life, and we want to be sure our team knows we stand behind this, and that they have the flexibility to take care of their life and those around them when needed.”

Incentives/Gamification

Another great way to increase engagement is through prizes, bonuses, awards, and other incentives. Turning work into a competition or game can motivate your team to do their best. It even works internationally, according to Christian Rennella, VP of HR & CoFounder

“After 9 years of hard work and having gone from 0 to 134 employees, I can assure you that the best strategy is ‘gamification’…Thanks to this gamification we were able to improve our retention by 31.1%.”

Health Insurance

Health insurance is usually the most expensive benefit (by a wide margin), but it’s also the most sought after. Paying for insurance out of pocket is expensive, and paying doctors’ bills without insurance is even worse, so it makes sense why applicants make career decisions based largely on insurance benefits.

5ae19be3ca3c9.jpg

Additional Ideas for Engaging and Retaining Your Team

Free Food

We hold ‘Pizza and Presentations’ twice a month, where we treat our employees to a catered lunch in one of our conference rooms. Not only does this allow our team to enjoy time together and receive updates about each department’s projects, it provides everyone a chance to celebrate milestones in the company. This is a great way to say thank you to your employees for their hard work.”

We find that often it’s small things that matter. Like setting out bowls of healthy snacks throughout the office a couple days each week. It’s nice for the employees, good for health, but it also brings groups to the break rooms, where they can mingle and get to know people outside their own departments. The same concept applies to volunteer opportunities, and our highly competitive (yet still fun) 5k.

Unique Time Off

I like summer Fridays, which we do a version of at Community Health Charities (and other employers have offered this). Some employers have you work longer hours during the week and get every other Friday off, or for us, we close early every Friday afternoon for employees to get a jump on the weekend during the summer. This is very popular!”

"Snow days! When winter weather causes hazardous travel conditions, we encourage employees to stay home and take a ‘snow day’. Essentially, they are not charged against their leave for opting to stay out of the office. Many workers have children who may also have a canceled school day when bad weather hits. Encouraging employees to stay home, if possible, not only reduces the stress of their day but shows them that we value their safety. In return, we often see the employees ‘online’ or still producing work remotely.”

**How to Decide What Employee Benefits and Perks to Offer

5ae19c8b6adf0.jpg

Hopefully, in addition to providing a compelling argument, we’ve sparked some new ideas on where to begin with offering benefits and perks to your team. As for deciding exactly what to implement, that may be a little harder. Just remember, it all depends on what kind of talent you’re trying to attract. As Jody Ordioni puts it: “When considering which benefits to offer, companies need to consider their talent needs and tailor benefits to the wants and needs of the people they need most.”

But, you may be thinking, doesn’t everyone like more time off? “Different generations are looking for different things in the workplace. I love to focus and get work done, but one of my Millennial colleagues thought the [peace and] quiet was more ‘like a graveyard’ and wanted to be more social and engage with his colleagues to get energized about his work. We have employees from early 20s to mid-60s and not everyone wants the same perk so it’s important to ask employees.”

![5ae1968301aa8.png](serve/attachment&path=5ae1968301aa8.png) We believe that the most valuable resources an organization has are its human resources. And we believe in showing employees how valuable they are to the organization. That’s why we encourage offering valuable benefits and perks to employees and why we have created a culture of appreciation within our own company. It’s a philosophy that’s not necessarily new—the idea that employees who are treated better perform better—but it’s starting to gain momentum in the professional world. Around the world, companies are beginning to realize that offering major benefits like flexible work schedules, unlimited PTO, and unique perks like a vacation reimbursement program can do wonders for morale and productivity. Unfortunately, despite the growing body of evidence in favor of this philosophy, many employers are still skeptical and reluctant to offer much beyond a steady paycheck. To help convince naysayers that pampering employees promotes productivity, we asked industry professionals about their experiences with offering benefits and perks. The response was overwhelming, and each CEO, COO, and HR professional that responded was in favor of them. Here, we share with you their insights, experiences, and advice. We hope it will inspire you to go and do likewise. It’s our firm belief that as you use benefits and perks to show your workforce that their contributions are appreciated and that they are valued as individuals, you will see engagement levels increase, retention rates improve, and your organization will become more attractive to prospective employees. The Impact of Benefits and Perks on Employee Engagement and Retention --------------------------------------------------------------------- “Due to the improved economic and job market conditions, the advantage has shifted from the employer to the job seeker, and organizations need to recognize the correlation between benefits and employee retention. In today’s hiring market, a generous benefits package is essential for engaging and retaining your talent.” It’s becoming harder and harder for employers to ignore: the healthier the job market, the easier it is for employees to jump ship when they find something better. Attracting and keeping employees takes offering them a position at a company where their work is seen as a valuable contribution. “Benefits and perks are a huge part of employee engagement and retention,” says Mary Pharris of Fairygodboss. “For companies to attract top talent and retain them, competitive benefit packages are essential. Employees rely on a variety of benefits from employers, so making sure you’re offering competitive and desired benefits will help you in attracting talent.” While not everyone agrees that attracting talent is the goal of perks and benefits, the belief in its power to boost engagement and retention is both ubiquitous and unanimous. “While benefits are not a large driver of talent acquisition,” says Jody Ordioni, Founder of Brandemix, “they have a tremendous positive impact on engagement and retention, especially now that millennials represent 30+ percent of today’s workforce.” Most importantly, offering a generous benefits package has a non-trivial impact, observable by many businesses. According to Lee Fisher, HR manager at Blinds Direct, “For us, these perks are tremendously important, from the moment an applicant sees a job ad and applies for a job here. Five or six years down the line, employee benefits continue to play a major role in keeping our valuable team members happy.” It seems every company that’s putting this philosophy into practice is noticing a difference. “Company benefits play a huge role in employee retention,” says Steve Pritchard, founder of Cuuver. “It’s a two-way street; if an employer is flexible and offers great benefits, staff are generally more likely to want to stay working for them and appreciate the perks they are being offered that they may not get at another company.” **Is There a Downside to Benefits and Perks?** ---------------------------------------------- ### Finding Balance Despite the growing evidence, some businesses are still skeptical. The high price of some benefits may intimidate a cost-conscious professional. Some even believe their workforce can’t be trusted with the freedom and responsibility of benefits like flexible work schedules. Some don’t think they need or deserve such luxuries. It may even be a simple lack of thinking outside the box on the part of the employer. Whatever the reason, each employer may be overlooking an important fact—that without their team, they don’t have a business. Benefits and perks are investments in your workforce, and they pay dividends in the form of loyalty and dedication to the company. Lisa Oyler, HR director at Access Perks, agrees: We always say that no company has ever suffered from trying to be more empathetic to their customers and employees. The cost and effort are worth it when you consider the huge advantages of employee engagement and retention and the costs of turnover and disengagement. ![5ae1991705663.jpg](serve/attachment&path=5ae1991705663.jpg) In my experience, employees are very appreciative of the perks they are given and do not abuse them. I can’t say this will be the same in every business, but because these benefits are there to make them happier, employees generally make the most of them and perform better. Some companies believe that having strict rules and no extra benefits is the way to go – which is why they don’t hold on to their best staff members for very long. Obstacles on the Path --------------------- Even if you decide that your employees are worth the investment, there are hurdles to clear on the road to successfully implementing your benefits and perks. The one negative I’ve become aware of is when managers aren’t on board with the benefits culture; i.e. if an organization encourages remote work but one’s manager requires all employees to be on-site, it creates a culture of resentment which could have an opposite effect from the desired results. **The Most Effective Benefits and Perks** ----------------------------------------- So what benefits and perks you should be offering? Which ones give you the highest return on investment? We think Patrick Colvin’s take sums it up best: The fact of the matter is, after health insurance, the most desirable perks and benefits are those that offer flexibility while improving work-life balance. ### Flexible Work Schedule/Telecommuting By far the most ubiquitous, popular, and highly recommended benefit among business owners and management teams was a flexible work schedule (usually including telecommuting & work-from-home options). This is largely due to the much-discussed “work-life balance.” Michelle Hayward, CEO, and Founder of Bluedog Design thinks that flexible work schedules should see even more use: “The most under-appreciated and under-utilized perk in a modern workplace is flexibility. With accountability to the team in mind, employees are empowered to make decisions to attend a child’s school performance or to work from home when life happens or plan flex hours to make a commute less stressful.” Robin Schwartz agrees: “Flexible work schedules! Being able to occasionally work remotely as well as being able to shift hours that best fit an employee’s life and job goes a really long way in keeping employees happy and [maintaining] engagement. Knowing they are encouraged to balance their work and life is a great perk.” ![5ae19b2435a96.jpg](serve/attachment&path=5ae19b2435a96.jpg) “From our research, we know that women’s job satisfaction is directly related to job flexibility. More and more employees are wanting flexible work environments. In large part, I think this is because life isn’t confined to the hours before or after work. Employees want the option to take care both of personal and professional responsibilities on their own terms, and with so much technology to make working remotely easy, it’s increasingly easier for employees to satisfy this.” Far from stifling or inhibiting productivity, this benefit seems to enhance it, according to our responders. Lee Fisher puts it this way: “We’ve come to realize that flexible-working is one of the biggest benefits for our staff. When we give our team the option to adapt their hours and work locations, they appreciate our flexibility and in turn produce even better results. It’s a simple perk, but a seriously important one.” ### Generous/Unlimited Vacation ![5ae19b649bc43.jpg](serve/attachment&path=5ae19b649bc43.jpg) A generous amount of time off. Giving employees plenty of opportunities to pursue their personal passions and unwind from work can go a long way towards improving their performance when they are at work. This ensures they don’t become frustrated with the lack of ability to take more than one vacation a year or take a few long weekends.” Unlimited Vacation – to give the team the flexibility and reassurance that they can feel comfortable taking time off without penalty goes a long way. They don’t have to stress over a random Friday or afternoon where they need to be somewhere else (for themselves or family) and how it will overall effect their time off at the end of the year. One of our core values is to be empowered to be awesome in work and life, and we want to be sure our team knows we stand behind this, and that they have the flexibility to take care of their life and those around them when needed.” ### Incentives/Gamification Another great way to increase engagement is through prizes, bonuses, awards, and other incentives. Turning work into a competition or game can motivate your team to do their best. It even works internationally, according to Christian Rennella, VP of HR & CoFounder “After 9 years of hard work and having gone from 0 to 134 employees, I can assure you that the best strategy is ‘gamification’…Thanks to this gamification we were able to improve our retention by 31.1%.” ### Health Insurance Health insurance is usually the most expensive benefit (by a wide margin), but it’s also the most sought after. Paying for insurance out of pocket is expensive, and paying doctors’ bills without insurance is even worse, so it makes sense why applicants make career decisions based largely on insurance benefits. ![5ae19be3ca3c9.jpg](serve/attachment&path=5ae19be3ca3c9.jpg) **Additional Ideas for Engaging and Retaining Your Team** --------------------------------------------------------- ### Free Food We hold ‘Pizza and Presentations’ twice a month, where we treat our employees to a catered lunch in one of our conference rooms. Not only does this allow our team to enjoy time together and receive updates about each department’s projects, it provides everyone a chance to celebrate milestones in the company. This is a great way to say thank you to your employees for their hard work.” We find that often it’s small things that matter. Like setting out bowls of healthy snacks throughout the office a couple days each week. It’s nice for the employees, good for health, but it also brings groups to the break rooms, where they can mingle and get to know people outside their own departments. The same concept applies to volunteer opportunities, and our highly competitive (yet still fun) 5k. ### Unique Time Off I like summer Fridays, which we do a version of at Community Health Charities (and other employers have offered this). Some employers have you work longer hours during the week and get every other Friday off, or for us, we close early every Friday afternoon for employees to get a jump on the weekend during the summer. This is very popular!” "Snow days! When winter weather causes hazardous travel conditions, we encourage employees to stay home and take a ‘snow day’. Essentially, they are not charged against their leave for opting to stay out of the office. Many workers have children who may also have a canceled school day when bad weather hits. Encouraging employees to stay home, if possible, not only reduces the stress of their day but shows them that we value their safety. In return, we often see the employees ‘online’ or still producing work remotely.” **How to Decide What Employee Benefits and Perks to Offer ------------------ ![5ae19c8b6adf0.jpg](serve/attachment&path=5ae19c8b6adf0.jpg) Hopefully, in addition to providing a compelling argument, we’ve sparked some new ideas on where to begin with offering benefits and perks to your team. As for deciding exactly what to implement, that may be a little harder. Just remember, it all depends on what kind of talent you’re trying to attract. As Jody Ordioni puts it: “When considering which benefits to offer, companies need to consider their talent needs and tailor benefits to the wants and needs of the people they need most.” But, you may be thinking, doesn’t everyone like more time off? “Different generations are looking for different things in the workplace. I love to focus and get work done, but one of my Millennial colleagues thought the [peace and] quiet was more ‘like a graveyard’ and wanted to be more social and engage with his colleagues to get energized about his work. We have employees from early 20s to mid-60s and not everyone wants the same perk so it’s important to ask employees.”
edited Apr 26 at 3:02 pm
 
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