HR departments is achieving team effectiveness. But how do we measure this?

Team effectiveness and performance evaluation have always been hot buzzwords in the industry. Leaders of those teams often ask “How do we enhance the performance of our team?” The question then posed in return by trainers and consultants alike would be: “Which aspects do you need to improve on?” or “How do you measure your performance?” Very often, there is no definitive answer.

The challenge with performance evaluation, in general, is that most teams are currently measured by competency frameworks or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). However, the problems that teams are plagued with are not competency-based but more relational or behaviour-based. These are sometimes known as team performance traps. Conflicts, tensions, and misunderstandings are some of the frustrations team members experience. This, in my opinion, is a result of poor communication, at the basic level.

Picture this. Teammate A says to Teammate B, “I have an idea! Let’s approach this project in a new way – I know it will work and I think it will be really interesting to do it this way!” Teammate B might respond, “What makes you think it will work? I think it’s far too risky to try a new approach at this juncture. Let’s just go with the tried and tested.” Teammate A may be turned off by such a response, and disengage.

Is one of them right in this case, or is it a case of each of them having a different way of thinking? In times like these, it is difficult to see that they both actually have the same purpose – they both want to get the project done, and done WELL! They simply have different approaches.

If not dealt with properly, this could easily go downhill very quickly, and if these two were in the same intact team, it may be the start of a strained relationship that leads to mistrust and perhaps conflict. Imagine: if this was just one instance of many other similar relationships in an organisation, the organisational culture could easily become a very negative one.

Since individuals in a team differ, we might as well capitalise on each person’s uniqueness as part of the ability to look at a situation from many perspectives. It then becomes a team strength. Improving how a team performs can start from the motivation of individuals in the team, allowing each member to thrive by recognizing diversity. This would also mean that the leader has to put aside his natural inclinations and accept that there may be alternative solutions to the same problem. Once individuals are fully on board, the team can come together and recognise that regardless of our natural inclinations, we will always adopt a diversified approach to solving a problem or completing a task – and that is a good thing!

At Emergenetics, we call this the WEapproach (Whole Emergenetics Approach).

This simply means managing a task, project, or team, no matter how simple or complex, from the Emergenetics framework of four diverse thinking and three behavioural preferences. This goes a long way towards helping each of us ensure that a holistic approach is always made, despite our individual preferences and inclinations, while also offering team members a common language to speak with, relate to, and understand each other better.

HR departments is achieving team effectiveness. But how do we measure this? Team effectiveness and performance evaluation have always been hot buzzwords in the industry. Leaders of those teams often ask “How do we enhance the performance of our team?” The question then posed in return by trainers and consultants alike would be: “Which aspects do you need to improve on?” or “How do you measure your performance?” Very often, there is no definitive answer. The challenge with performance evaluation, in general, is that most teams are currently measured by competency frameworks or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). However, the problems that teams are plagued with are not competency-based but more relational or behaviour-based. These are sometimes known as team performance traps. Conflicts, tensions, and misunderstandings are some of the frustrations team members experience. This, in my opinion, is a result of poor communication, at the basic level. Picture this. Teammate A says to Teammate B, “I have an idea! Let’s approach this project in a new way – I know it will work and I think it will be really interesting to do it this way!” Teammate B might respond, “What makes you think it will work? I think it’s far too risky to try a new approach at this juncture. Let’s just go with the tried and tested.” Teammate A may be turned off by such a response, and disengage. Is one of them right in this case, or is it a case of each of them having a different way of thinking? In times like these, it is difficult to see that they both actually have the same purpose – they both want to get the project done, and done WELL! They simply have different approaches. If not dealt with properly, this could easily go downhill very quickly, and if these two were in the same intact team, it may be the start of a strained relationship that leads to mistrust and perhaps conflict. Imagine: if this was just one instance of many other similar relationships in an organisation, the organisational culture could easily become a very negative one. Since individuals in a team differ, we might as well capitalise on each person’s uniqueness as part of the ability to look at a situation from many perspectives. It then becomes a team strength. Improving how a team performs can start from the motivation of individuals in the team, allowing each member to thrive by recognizing diversity. This would also mean that the leader has to put aside his natural inclinations and accept that there may be alternative solutions to the same problem. Once individuals are fully on board, the team can come together and recognise that regardless of our natural inclinations, we will always adopt a diversified approach to solving a problem or completing a task – and that is a good thing! **At Emergenetics, we call this the WEapproach (Whole Emergenetics Approach).** This simply means managing a task, project, or team, no matter how simple or complex, from the Emergenetics framework of four diverse thinking and three behavioural preferences. This goes a long way towards helping each of us ensure that a holistic approach is always made, despite our individual preferences and inclinations, while also offering team members a common language to speak with, relate to, and understand each other better.
edited Apr 27 at 3:05 pm
 
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